EnterpriseOne

The EnterpriseOne category will include all posts and pages pertaining to EnterpriseOne.

JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Tools Release 9.2.1.4

https://i2.wp.com/e1tips.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/cropped-information-technology-page.jpg?resize=600%2C286

Just in case you missed it, the latest JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Tools Release is now generally available.

As with most new releases, there are some interesting features included: enhancements to EnterpriseOne Search, new Orchestration capabilities, additional flexibility for Media Object storage, and platform certifications.

However, there are a couple things that I think are especially interesting:

  • “Rather than being licensed as a discrete product, the usage of Orchestrator is now included as part of JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Core Tools and Infrastructure.”
    • That’s right! The way I read this is that if you are licensed for JDE Core Tools & Infrastructure, you are now licensed for Orchestrator. Good news if you’ve been on the fence about using this new technology or don’t have a big enough project to make the licensing worth it.
  • You can now store Media Objects on the file system or in the database which enables you to upgrade to TR 9.2.1.4 without re-writing existing Medio Object integrations.

It’s great to see all the improvements that are being made.

What do you think is the most compelling improvement to get you to upgrade?

Activate Callstack Dump From Server Manager

Server_Manager-Enterprise_Server_Processes

While doing some not-so-fun troubleshooting, we needed to get a callstack dump from a Call Object Kernel that was going into a zombie state. I hate those things!

Anyway, follow the steps below to get a callstack dump from Oracle JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Enterprise Server:

  1. Within the Network and Queue Settings configuration, verify Jdenet_n Signal Handler is enabled.
    Server_Manager-Network_Queue_Settings
  2. Set the Create Kernel Process Dumps to Create Kernel Dumps
    Server_Manager-Network_Queue_Settings2
  3. When a call object kernel crashes (zombie) locate it in Server Manager and open the jde.log.
  4. Scroll down to the bottom and you will see an entry related to a dump file. On a Windows Server, the entry will tell you exactly where the file is located. For Linux and Unix locate the dump file in the same directory as the parent logs files.

Now, the fun part you get to try and figure out what happened.

Do you have any tips when it comes to getting or reading dmp files?

Submit a Tip or Trick

ESU Installation Comparison Using SQL

oracle-sql-developer

If your JDE EnterpriseOne installation has been installed for more than oh, 2 weeks your pathcodes have obviously gotten out-of-sync. Ok, maybe it’s not that bad, but DV and PY can become much different than PD faster than a three-legged fox in a hen house. Is that fast? I don’t know, but it doesn’t take long. There are many reasons as to why the pathcodes get out-of-sync:

  • Testing an ESU without cleaning up after it didn’t resolve the issue
  • Forgetting about an ESU that was installed in DV or PY
  • Developers being slow to do retro-fits

Now, Developers, don’t get upset. I love developers. They provide job security for CNC Admins! Now come on I’m just hackin’ on ya.

You can use SQL Developer to connect to the E1Local database.

The SQL I used to compare the ESU installations between pathcodes is below. This example tells us which ESUs are in PY910 but not in PD910. The SDSUDET=’90’ indicates that the ESU has been installed in that pathcode.

select sdpkgname as ESUNAME from f9671
where sdsudfut2='PY910' and sdsudet = '90'
minus
select sdpkgname as ESUNAME from f9671
where sdsudfut2='PD910' and sdsudet = '90'

Any other quick and dirty SQLs that you use to report on ESUs? Please leave them in the comments below.

How To Start SQLPlus From The Linux Command Line

Run the following commands from the Linux command line to start SQLPlus:

export ORACLE_HOME=/path/to/install/dir
export PATH=$PATH:$ORACLE_HOME/bin
sqlplus

 

 

3 Ways To Find Your Oracle Weblogic Version

There are at least 3 different ways to find the version of Oracle Weblogic Server that you are running:

  1. Using the registry.xml file located in your MW_HOME directory.
    • example: /u01/weblogic/Oracle/Middleware or E:\Oracle\Middleware
    • Look for a line similar to:
      <component name=”WebLogic Server” version=”10.3.4.0″ InstallDir=”/u01/weblogic/Oracle/Middleware/wlserver_10.3″&gt;
  2. Using the .product.properties file located in your WLS_HOME directory.
    • example: /u01/weblogic/Oracle/Middleware/wlserver_10.3 or E:\Oracle\Middleware\wlserver_10.3
    • Look for a line similar to:
      WLS_PRODUCT_VERSION=10.3.4.0
  3. Using the Oracle Weblogic Server Administration Console
    • Use the left hand menu to navigate to Environment -&gt; Servers. Then, click the [Monitoring] tab. You should see a screen similar to the one below:
      Oracle Weblogic Server Administration Console